I Have Hashimoto’s

My doctor(s) and I have been at odds for years—since early 2016—regarding my hypothyroid state and whether or not it should be treated. If you’re accustomed to searching the internet for thyroid-related information, you probably expect this to be a post about how my thyroid hormone levels are in the “normal” range, but that I still have symptoms, and how I think I should be taking—or upping my dose of—generic levothyroxine or Synthroid specifically or natural dessicated thyroid.

If so, your expectations are wrong.

I’m asymptomatic for hypothyroidism; my thyroid hormone levels aren’t horrible, but my free T4 and TSH levels aren’t normal, either; I’m afraid to take levothyroxine again, due to past experience (which actually was horrible); I don’t see the benefit of taking it, given my heart rate and energy levels; and my doctors want me to take it, anyway

I finally saw an endocrinologist for the first time—no mean feat, given that I was diagnosed with diabetes way back in 2004—a few months ago. I was in a big way of complaining—half-way to panic, because the whole arguing-with-people-who-know-more-than-I-do shtick is stressful as hell—about how I don’t even know if have Hashimoto’s or some other root cause, when the endo apologized.

She thought I’d been tested for Hashimoto’s before I was referred to her.

Well, now I have.

I went for a blood draw on the 7th of this month, and the results showed up in my online chart the same day.

My anti-TPO antibody level was 687 IU/mL, with a reference range of <9.

You may think that’s a bad thing, but you’d be wrong about that, too.

Sure, not having Hashimoto’s disease is preferable to having Hashimoto’s disease. But being hypothyroid with atypical presentation while not knowing what’s causing it is worse than being hypothyroid with atypical presentation and having the explanatory data.

Knowledge is power, y’all.

And, in this case, it’s peace of mind.

Ask questions when you’re uncertain.

And keep asking until you get answers.